liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)
Malabrigo Yarns makes this gorgeous Rasta yarn. It's super chunky, variegated due to kettle dyeing techniques, and super soft to the skin. The kettle dyeing technique is one that I've been wanting to try for some time, but never really got around to doing until this last week.

Pictures of a Rasta Cowl and then my own experiments with dyeing. )

Recovering

Nov. 6th, 2010 10:34 pm
liralen: Finch Painting (Fai)
I've mostly recovered from the eye infection. After running through all the systemic antibiotics and a full bottle of the antibiotic eye drops with steriod-based antihistamines, my eyes have mostly cleared up. The flu thing that hit me so hard pretty much finished out the month for me.

I slept a lot for nearly two weeks. Thank you to *everyone* that wished me better health when I was having problems.

Last weekend, [livejournal.com profile] darkprism_fics and I heard back from Torquere and they want the manuscript, with another set of edits, and the editor was good enough to deliver on the pain before delivering on the "I want to see Torquere publish this". (Uhm... it's been a funny kind of Yay Us! But We Have To WORK). So we spent the first five days of last week cutting 10,000 words, and going over it with a fine-toothed comb after.

Nanowrimo Goals, a Sweater for Jet, and an Aeolian Alpaca Lace Shawl. )

Recovering

Nov. 6th, 2010 10:34 pm
liralen: Finch Painting (Fai)
I've mostly recovered from the eye infection. After running through all the systemic antibiotics and a full bottle of the antibiotic eye drops with steriod-based antihistamines, my eyes have mostly cleared up. The flu thing that hit me so hard pretty much finished out the month for me.

I slept a lot for nearly two weeks. Thank you to *everyone* that wished me better health when I was having problems.

Last weekend, [livejournal.com profile] darkprism_fics and I heard back from Torquere and they want the manuscript, with another set of edits, and the editor was good enough to deliver on the pain before delivering on the "I want to see Torquere publish this". (Uhm... it's been a funny kind of Yay Us! But We Have To WORK). So we spent the first five days of last week cutting 10,000 words, and going over it with a fine-toothed comb after.

Nanowrimo Goals, a Sweater for Jet, and an Aeolian Alpaca Lace Shawl. )

Yarn Porn

Jan. 12th, 2009 10:53 pm
liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)
I should probably cross-post there... hm... been a while...

Cut for the graphic pictures. )

Yarn Porn

Jan. 12th, 2009 10:53 pm
liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)
I should probably cross-post there... hm... been a while...

Cut for the graphic pictures. )
liralen: Finch Painting (My_hat)
For reasons unknown to all three of us, Jet has picked up an Outrageously bad British Accent. He's clipping his words and turning them and he's doing it without even being entirely aware of it until we start giggling.

I'll blame the Monty Python Fluxx and the fact that we played it with three different groups during our trip and whenever the "Outrageous Accent" card came up folks would enthusiastically bound into doing really, really bad accents. *laughs* But even Jet says he has no idea why he's doing it.

Cut for visuals of other things and a huge Jet Burp. )
liralen: Finch Painting (My_hat)
For reasons unknown to all three of us, Jet has picked up an Outrageously bad British Accent. He's clipping his words and turning them and he's doing it without even being entirely aware of it until we start giggling.

I'll blame the Monty Python Fluxx and the fact that we played it with three different groups during our trip and whenever the "Outrageous Accent" card came up folks would enthusiastically bound into doing really, really bad accents. *laughs* But even Jet says he has no idea why he's doing it.

Cut for visuals of other things and a huge Jet Burp. )
liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)

So the leftover dye from nearly three weeks ago was deteriorating... the acid and the dyes don't work quite as well a long time after they've been mixed... so the boys decided they had enough shirts, and both bought two packages of new underwear.  *laughs*  Yeah.  I found a top that I've always hated being white, some socks, a few pairs of underwear, and had John buy me a one pound cone of Peaches and Cream 100% cotton yarn. 

I skeined up the yarn.  After all the other stuff was done, I basically poured dyes from the bottles onto the yarn and got some interesting results.  Sadly, the gold-yellow didn't take at all.  It may have broken down faster than the other or something.  I'm not sure... but anyway... the results are in pictures below the cut.

Cut for pictures of the results. )

liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)

So the leftover dye from nearly three weeks ago was deteriorating... the acid and the dyes don't work quite as well a long time after they've been mixed... so the boys decided they had enough shirts, and both bought two packages of new underwear.  *laughs*  Yeah.  I found a top that I've always hated being white, some socks, a few pairs of underwear, and had John buy me a one pound cone of Peaches and Cream 100% cotton yarn. 

I skeined up the yarn.  After all the other stuff was done, I basically poured dyes from the bottles onto the yarn and got some interesting results.  Sadly, the gold-yellow didn't take at all.  It may have broken down faster than the other or something.  I'm not sure... but anyway... the results are in pictures below the cut.

Cut for pictures of the results. )

liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)
So, when I checked out the Twisted Sisters Sock Workbook from the library, there was a section in there about knitting with "energized singles", i.e. singles that had enough twist to be springy, but not so much they were twine-like. Up until now I haven't been confident enough of my singles to actually knit with them by themselves. One of the great things about two-ply is if one breaks while in use, there's always the other to back it up.

Plus the plying makes the yarn softer, more lofty, and even though the spin is in the other direction, because the two (or three or four...) plies are actually being twisted more because of being together. So that makes it even stronger.

So I haven't really been brave enough to do singles. But I saw a really beautiful example of Dudley Spinner's single ply socks while I was at the Weaver's Guild show, and I'm really, really tempted, now, to just do something like that. I'm using black faced Leicester, as it's strong enough on its own. Plus I'd dyed some really nice fall colors, and then over-dyed it again as the original was too faded for me. So it's really deep reds, greens, and warm browns now. Perfect for socks for me.

So I'm spinning the wool on my spindle and I'm very happy with how it's turning out. I'm also really ruminating over how to build the sock, as I'm not going to have a great idea of the gauge until I try it. Probably use #1 or #0 needles, and I'll likely be putting bits of roving into the parts of the sock that'll be under the heel and ball of the foot as that's where I wear them out first. So few of my every day shoes have heels that the back of my socks almost never wear out.

This should be fun. It's cool to *think* about a sock again.
liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)
So, when I checked out the Twisted Sisters Sock Workbook from the library, there was a section in there about knitting with "energized singles", i.e. singles that had enough twist to be springy, but not so much they were twine-like. Up until now I haven't been confident enough of my singles to actually knit with them by themselves. One of the great things about two-ply is if one breaks while in use, there's always the other to back it up.

Plus the plying makes the yarn softer, more lofty, and even though the spin is in the other direction, because the two (or three or four...) plies are actually being twisted more because of being together. So that makes it even stronger.

So I haven't really been brave enough to do singles. But I saw a really beautiful example of Dudley Spinner's single ply socks while I was at the Weaver's Guild show, and I'm really, really tempted, now, to just do something like that. I'm using black faced Leicester, as it's strong enough on its own. Plus I'd dyed some really nice fall colors, and then over-dyed it again as the original was too faded for me. So it's really deep reds, greens, and warm browns now. Perfect for socks for me.

So I'm spinning the wool on my spindle and I'm very happy with how it's turning out. I'm also really ruminating over how to build the sock, as I'm not going to have a great idea of the gauge until I try it. Probably use #1 or #0 needles, and I'll likely be putting bits of roving into the parts of the sock that'll be under the heel and ball of the foot as that's where I wear them out first. So few of my every day shoes have heels that the back of my socks almost never wear out.

This should be fun. It's cool to *think* about a sock again.
liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)

My Construction Barrier Socks
Originally uploaded by Liralen Li.
These are my Construction Site Socks... actually Jaywalkers, but I, once again, munged the pattern to the point of no return by using US 2's instead of 1's, so only had 60 stitches, and four panels of 15 stitches instead of whatever was in the pattern. I turned my own heel and did my own toes, with a three stitch side with decreases.

I love how the pattern turned out and how they give that distinctive pattern. Jet wants a pair, now, too. I'm going to have to figure out how to make them his size. Maybe just three panels of 15?
liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)

My Construction Barrier Socks
Originally uploaded by Liralen Li.
These are my Construction Site Socks... actually Jaywalkers, but I, once again, munged the pattern to the point of no return by using US 2's instead of 1's, so only had 60 stitches, and four panels of 15 stitches instead of whatever was in the pattern. I turned my own heel and did my own toes, with a three stitch side with decreases.

I love how the pattern turned out and how they give that distinctive pattern. Jet wants a pair, now, too. I'm going to have to figure out how to make them his size. Maybe just three panels of 15?
liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)

Loom from the Front
Originally uploaded by Liralen Li.
I'm finally getting together what I need to sell this black walnut, four-harness, counter-balanced loom that I'd bought in Seattle nearly a decade ago. I figure that if I haven't used it by now I'm not likely to. Don't know if there's anyone out there that's thinking of buying a loom, but our price is kind of squishy at the moment as I'm not sure what we can get for it at the moment.

We don't know the manufacturer, but it seems to be very solidly built. I'm doing some research to figure it out. But it's a 42" wide loom, and the new ones from name brands seem to be going for multiple thousands. Meefle. Just in case any one reading this has a lead to someone that would love this beast for what it is. *grin*

Click on the picture to get to other pictures from other angles.
liralen: Finch Painting (yarn)

Loom from the Front
Originally uploaded by Liralen Li.
I'm finally getting together what I need to sell this black walnut, four-harness, counter-balanced loom that I'd bought in Seattle nearly a decade ago. I figure that if I haven't used it by now I'm not likely to. Don't know if there's anyone out there that's thinking of buying a loom, but our price is kind of squishy at the moment as I'm not sure what we can get for it at the moment.

We don't know the manufacturer, but it seems to be very solidly built. I'm doing some research to figure it out. But it's a 42" wide loom, and the new ones from name brands seem to be going for multiple thousands. Meefle. Just in case any one reading this has a lead to someone that would love this beast for what it is. *grin*

Click on the picture to get to other pictures from other angles.
liralen: Finch Painting (bullseye)
I'm kind of peering at Etsy and being fascinated. Especially with the stashes of hand spun I have at home, that it would be cool to find a home for. Hm. I have to admit that I spin much faster than I knit, and I have three or four bunches of hand spun laceweight wools from back when it was too hard to buy commercial lace weight yarns. I know that I'm probably never going to get around to knitting them, so why not sell them to someone that would really value them for what they are?

Might well be worthwhile at the prices they're talking about for advertising things.

Thanks [livejournal.com profile] palinade for being the pointer to it all. I appreciate that a lot.

The bee class last night was a total and complete coverage of the biology, life cycle, and ecology of honey bees Apis mellifera. It was astonishingly thorough, some of it was stuff that I'd heard about in concept (dancing to communicate where pollen/nectar sources are) but the natural science teacher provided astonishing detail about it (circle dance=close, figure-8=further, speed/number of iterations=distance, angle of the dances=relative angle from the sun with the top of the hive as "at the sun", and, the newest bit, that the frequency of the buzzing while dancing equates to the height from the standard flight pattern from the hive). Sexes, birth, through death for all three social elements, and it was pretty fun. I didn't need to read the book, but it helped to make it easy to follow along with the other details.

I think that what I liked the best were the personal stories. Like the teacher, when she was a girl, accidentally smashed a yellow jacket nest, and had been stung over 100 times that one time. So, when she started beekeeping, she was deathly afraid of getting stung. Then, one day, she'd had a family over to teach them about extraction of honey, and they'd done a few frames, and wanted to go see something else. So the family left after she'd given them directions and things, and she went back to clean up. The extractor had been, accidentally, left open. A bee had found it and brought over 100 of her sisters. But they were getting stuck in the honey when they landed on it to collect it and were, basically drowning in 40 pounds of honey!

She felt really bad about her bees dying through no fault of their own, and so she started rescuing them. She just dug in there and pulled out big handfuls of bees and set them on the ground, where they struggled to find each other and clean each other off. Which she thought was very cool. She realized she'd been so frantic to safe them she hadn't worried about getting stung at all. Then she realized she was getting tickled on her arms, and where she'd dug into the honey, she was covered with her bees, who were just cleaning her off as well. Awwww... :-)

I think it's the personality bits about the domesticated honey bee that amaze me. The biology, what glands do which and how they all work is interesting mechanics for trying to figure out what's happening when there are problems. But... how they interact with people is fascinating to me.
liralen: Finch Painting (bullseye)
I'm kind of peering at Etsy and being fascinated. Especially with the stashes of hand spun I have at home, that it would be cool to find a home for. Hm. I have to admit that I spin much faster than I knit, and I have three or four bunches of hand spun laceweight wools from back when it was too hard to buy commercial lace weight yarns. I know that I'm probably never going to get around to knitting them, so why not sell them to someone that would really value them for what they are?

Might well be worthwhile at the prices they're talking about for advertising things.

Thanks [livejournal.com profile] palinade for being the pointer to it all. I appreciate that a lot.

The bee class last night was a total and complete coverage of the biology, life cycle, and ecology of honey bees Apis mellifera. It was astonishingly thorough, some of it was stuff that I'd heard about in concept (dancing to communicate where pollen/nectar sources are) but the natural science teacher provided astonishing detail about it (circle dance=close, figure-8=further, speed/number of iterations=distance, angle of the dances=relative angle from the sun with the top of the hive as "at the sun", and, the newest bit, that the frequency of the buzzing while dancing equates to the height from the standard flight pattern from the hive). Sexes, birth, through death for all three social elements, and it was pretty fun. I didn't need to read the book, but it helped to make it easy to follow along with the other details.

I think that what I liked the best were the personal stories. Like the teacher, when she was a girl, accidentally smashed a yellow jacket nest, and had been stung over 100 times that one time. So, when she started beekeeping, she was deathly afraid of getting stung. Then, one day, she'd had a family over to teach them about extraction of honey, and they'd done a few frames, and wanted to go see something else. So the family left after she'd given them directions and things, and she went back to clean up. The extractor had been, accidentally, left open. A bee had found it and brought over 100 of her sisters. But they were getting stuck in the honey when they landed on it to collect it and were, basically drowning in 40 pounds of honey!

She felt really bad about her bees dying through no fault of their own, and so she started rescuing them. She just dug in there and pulled out big handfuls of bees and set them on the ground, where they struggled to find each other and clean each other off. Which she thought was very cool. She realized she'd been so frantic to safe them she hadn't worried about getting stung at all. Then she realized she was getting tickled on her arms, and where she'd dug into the honey, she was covered with her bees, who were just cleaning her off as well. Awwww... :-)

I think it's the personality bits about the domesticated honey bee that amaze me. The biology, what glands do which and how they all work is interesting mechanics for trying to figure out what's happening when there are problems. But... how they interact with people is fascinating to me.
liralen: Finch Painting (Default)

Close up of Mirror Twins
Originally uploaded by Liralen Li.
As a spinner, the skein on the right was the one that gave me pause. "That's not right." my hind brain says as did my fingers and my feet.

I'd find the singles coming loose and realize that I was going the wrong way AGAIN. Hee. It was fun to do, as it really got me very, very aware of what it was that I did on instinct, now, and what's conscious decision.

I love how the colors turned out and how the teal mohair shine just a little bit along all the edges. I'm glad of that, very much.

Thank you, [livejournal.com profile] sarakate, for a very interesting project! Yay!
liralen: Finch Painting (Default)

Close up of Mirror Twins
Originally uploaded by Liralen Li.
As a spinner, the skein on the right was the one that gave me pause. "That's not right." my hind brain says as did my fingers and my feet.

I'd find the singles coming loose and realize that I was going the wrong way AGAIN. Hee. It was fun to do, as it really got me very, very aware of what it was that I did on instinct, now, and what's conscious decision.

I love how the colors turned out and how the teal mohair shine just a little bit along all the edges. I'm glad of that, very much.

Thank you, [livejournal.com profile] sarakate, for a very interesting project! Yay!
liralen: Finch Painting (bullseye)
[livejournal.com profile] sarakate gave me a very, very cool commission in a very nicely constructed sock yarn.

Details and lots of pictures below the cut. )

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